Fujitsu Honors Local Teachers and Students for STEM Accomplishments

STEM education (Science, Technology, Math and Engineering) is an interdisciplinary approach to education where students learn science and math-centric fields via hands-on lessons. STEM has become a priority in American schools thanks in part to a critical need for those with the knowledge that STEM education teaches.

Studies show that 80% of jobs in the next decade will require a STEM skill. Unfortunately, the U.S. is lagging behind the rest of the world when it comes to teaching these critical skills. In fact, America ranks 29th in math and 22nd in science skills, and only 16 percent of American high school seniors who are proficient in math are actually interested in STEM careers.

Because of this lag in STEM skills and enthusiasm, Fujitsu Network Communications recognizes the importance of encouraging schools and educators to promote STEM, showing kids both how essential and how fulfilling STEM educational experiences can be.

As one of the world’s leading ICT companies, Fujitsu is well aware of how science and technology education can impact the future of the world. We understand that in order to inspire students, STEM skills need to be championed at every stage of learning: by parents, teachers, schools, mentors, non-profits and businesses alike. In 2010, we established the Fujitsu Teacher Trailblazer Award, an honor given to Richardson Independent School District (RISD) K-6 teachers who successfully integrate creative, innovative uses of technology as part of the instruction process. In 2018, we also began awarding Fujitsu STEM scholarships to graduating seniors from RISD and local alternative schools who plan to enter a two- or four-year college or university to major in a STEM field.

To qualify for the Fujitsu Teacher Trailblazer Award (which comes with a $5,000 prize), an RISD teacher must implement technology as part of the instruction process. They must also use innovative questioning and inquiry techniques to challenge students and harness instructional strategies to actively engage students in the learning process. The Fujitsu trailblazing teacher doesn’t just excel in the classroom, but also seeks out and engages in professional development activities.

This year’s Trailblazer winners are Audrey Leppke, a first-grade teacher at Math Science Technology Magnet School; and Sarah Beasley, a third-grade teacher at Lake Highlands Elementary School. Each received $5,000 personal award to recognize their great efforts.

In order to qualify for one of two $5,000 Fujitsu STEM scholarships, an RISD high school senior must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and have taken four years of science, technology, engineering and/or math classes with Bs or better. They must also be planning to enter a two- or four-year college or university to major in a STEM field. This year’s scholarships recipients are Adam Gallo and Joshua Harris.

STEM education is a growing priority in America, and Fujitsu has dedicated itself to furthering the cause in the area around its headquarters. By encouraging teachers and students to delve in and learn more about how they can benefit a deeper knowledge of science, math, and technology, we are helping create a larger group of career-ready people who will soon enter the workforce – and spreading the values of STEM subjects to younger generations.

About Johnnie Bocanegra