About Robert Worden

Robert Worden leads Fujitsu’s Smart Cities/Internet of Things (IoT) efforts in North America. Bringing 25 years of telecom leadership to this role, Robert’s charter is to digitally transform the operations of municipalities, state and local governments, utility and transportation operations in the US and Canada. Prior to this role, Robert led Fujitsu’s participation in building and operating the first P3 broadband network in the United States: KentuckyWired.

How to Make Your Utility Smarter … And What You Stand to Gain

With the advent of 5G, the Internet of Things (IoT), and cloud technologies, smart infrastructure enabled by high-speed connectivity is now closer than ever to being truly ubiquitous. These trends are driving a variety of advancements across a wide range of industries — from cost-efficiency and better customer service, to enhanced safety and security. The utility industry, in particular, is in a prime position to put smart infrastructure technologies to good use.

Many of today’s utilities — whether they are public power, investor-owned, or rural electric cooperatives — are struggling with how to evolve their business model in response to several imperatives:

  • De-carbonization – Reducing current and future carbon footprints by leveraging renewable energy resources
  • De-centralization – Expanding energy solutions to include wind, solar, hydro, micro-grids and other distributed energy resources
  • Digital transformation – Increased data harvesting to inform key decision-making

By embracing smart technology, utilities stand to benefit from the potential positive impacts of trusted data on their business operations, including service offerings that were not previously possible. These benefits offer utilities opportunities to preserve capital, increase revenue, build stronger customer engagement, and strengthen future viability to meet new or unforeseen challenges head-on.

Yet for some utilities, the path forward remains uncertain. What are the requirements for building out smart infrastructure, and what is the best route forward?

Building Blocks of a Smarter Future

Alongside the recent evolution of power transmission technologies, many utilities have modernized their communications infrastructure, for example by deploying advanced 100G networks to replace the old standard of 40 Mbps transmission. Investments of this type have provided greater network speed and capacity, creating a bedrock on which power providers can deploy the essential building blocks of a smart utility.

In order to benefit from this bedrock communications infrastructure, a utility needs trustworthy and actionable operating data.  Trusted data is harvested, analyzed and contextualized only by putting in place all (five) smart infrastructure blocks, of which high-speed connectivity is one. Being a smart utility therefore is more than having a fast network, it is about having smart infrastructure. The essential infrastructure blocks of the smart utility include:

  • Sensing Block – Gathers data from IoT devices and sensors, such as cameras, drones, and microphones. Key metrics gathered using sensors might include the speed and direction of turbine blade rotation, system voltage or current, outage detection, suspicious persons, weather conditions, tower pitch, or network connectivity status.
  • Network Infrastructure Block – Fiber and wireless network infrastructure transmits data between IoT devices, cameras, microphones, data management systems and cloud services. Traditional interconnected networks include SCADA, AMI, fiber, core, FTTx, microwave and 4G/ LTE mobile networks. Newer technology options include 5G and Low Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN) technologies.
  • Data Infrastructure Block – Data from the sensing layer is aggregated, stored and processed in the data infrastructure block, making it available for use. Data management consumes significant compute power both in the cloud and on premises, and requires high-availability databases, often referred to as data lakes, that are both secure and scalable.
  • Cloud Services Block – The services block combines cybersecurity, managed network services, artificial intelligence (AI), and big data analytics to ensure data integrity; protect devices; secure and optimize the network; and extract insights. The cybersecurity layer is vital for compliance with NERC-CIP requirements designed to protect critical infrastructure, customer data, and community safety, especially in light of increased cyber and physical attacks aimed at utilities.
  • Smart Applications Block – Smart applications are the user interfaces through which utility executives and employees consume actionable insights, such as real-time dashboards for energy consumption, flow control, leakage detection, and load monitoring.

By deploying these essential building blocks, utilities can infuse their operations with real-time trusteddata. Trusted data can help them increase productivity; improve reliability and efficiency; streamline regulatory compliance; reduce costs and risks; deliver new services; and enhance the quality of customer experience. Consider, for example, how smart technologies could be used to leverage thermal imaging data and the power of AI to identify overheated equipment, or spot emerging fire threats at remote utility substations.

Creating a Smarter Future

At Fujitsu, we’ve seen firsthand how smart infrastructure technologies can make a substantial difference to a utility company’s business and operations models — and their bottom line. As a full-service integration company, we recognize every utility’s unique situation and we help them develop a sensible business plan to deploy the building blocks of a smart utility, making the digital transformation journey together.

To learn more about how to build a smarter utility with the right infrastructure in place to inform better, faster decision-making, contact us to discuss your business case.

WHAT IS A “SMART CITY?” PART 2

In Part 1 of this article, we talked about some of the characteristics of a smart city, including hyperconnectivity, people-centric technology, and increased efficiency of city-provided services. But although those things are critically important, they’re not the end of the smart cities story.

Economic development is an important driver for most cities considering an upgrade to “smart” status, with most cities looking to attract new businesses to their community. But how? In 1942, economist and social scientist Joseph Schumpeter coined the term, “innovation economics,” which, he argued, meant that innovation was a major factor in spurring economic growth and change as it created “temporary monopolies” when new products and technologies were invented, that then encouraged the development of competing products and processes, thereby creating beneficial economic conditions. He further believed that government’s most important role was in creating a fertile ground in which these innovations could occur. In this sense, the smart, connected, and efficient city is the technological soil in which the seeds of economic growth will be planted, yielding profits and benefits that will in turn enrich both individuals and society at large. Therefore, the cities that are at the forefront of smart cities transformation will reap the largest benefits from this explosive, and in many case much-needed, growth.

For example, an unique and innovative display of economic development using smart technology is taking place right now in South Korea. A major grocery retailer wanted to expand business, but without opening additional physical locations. The answer proved to be “virtual shelves” in the city’s subway stations. Wall-length billboards display goods for sale, complete with images and prices, allowing customers to order by scanning QR codes, paying, and arranging for delivery within a day. This optimizes commuter time in the stations, and expands business for the retailer without the expense of a building, rent, utilities, maintenance, staff, and all the other requirements of a physical location. The result is that this retailer has reached the number one position in the online market, and the number two position in terms of brick-and-mortar stores.

Besides these obvious advantages, an area in which smart cities can actually save lives, and one that is top of mind around the world right now, is by helping to deal with natural disasters, before, during, and after the event. Sensors can continually monitor air and water quality, weather and seismic events, and even increased radiation levels, for example, thus providing critical early warnings of disasters about to happen, and can disperse that information to residents via smart phone apps. Once an event occurs, smart data can be used to provide much-needed safety information. During Hurricane Harvey, for example, data collected via connected systems was able to provide residents with real-time information about increased water levels through information from county flood gauges, as well as identify passable evacuation routes and assistance, available shelters, food banks, and more. Drones can be – and are being – used to survey damage and to aid in recovery efforts, reducing the risk for human crews. And this is clearly the tip of the iceberg as regards ways in which “smart” technology will be able to aid in human response to natural disasters.

Of course, these are only a few of the ways in which smart technology can benefit communities. Every city and county has its own needs, especially in the early planning stages of digital transformation. What’s important to remember, however, is that smart cities aren’t coming, they’re already here, and the earliest adopters of this incredible technology will be the ones to reap the greatest benefits from it. Those that delay, or who reject the smart cities model altogether, will quickly find themselves woefully behind the curve, unable to compete with those communities that showed more foresight in these early days. Customers and residents are constantly increasing their demands for bandwidth as the fuel needed to drive their desire for connectivity, and the communities that can provide these services seamlessly and easily win the lion’s share of business and revenue. It’s never too early to start thinking about smart city transformation, so what are you waiting for?

WHAT IS A “SMART CITY?” PART 1

Unless you’ve been living in a bunker deep underground for the last ten years, you’ve no doubt heard talk about “smart cities.” Everyone’s talking about it, and a few truly forward thinking cities around the world are making it happen. But what exactly is a “smart city,” and what does it mean to you?

The short answer is that the smart city concept is the logical and foreseeable outcome of a world in which connectivity has become an integral part of our daily lives. In a smart city, things like utilities, transportation, education, housing, and more are all connected via sensors that provide data in order to improve the quality of life of the city’s residents. Civic leaders use this data to make better, “smarter” decisions for the way the city operates and interacts with its citizens. It’s a way to make infrastructure more efficient, to make government more transparent, and to make day-to-day interactions with technology smoother.

The best smart city improvements are based on a people-centric model, in which technology is merely a tool that improves the lives of those it touches by solving problems that might otherwise be insurmountable. Imagine a “smart” parking lot that can alert you to an available parking space via an app on your phone, reducing or eliminating your time driving around hopelessly looking for one. Or how about  a smart communications system for emergency personnel, able to assess a situation holistically, summon the appropriate personnel, identify and notify the nearest hospital with the appropriate treatment facilities, and even turn traffic lights green as needed for the ambulance en route, thereby decreasing response time significantly.

These aren’t simply concepts found in science-fiction novels, but initiatives actually put in place today in smart cities around the world. By making use of data collected from a variety of sources in an intelligently-connected infrastructure, and parsing that data in useful ways, these smart applications can be used to improve the quality, performance and efficiency of everything from major water utilities to individual home appliances. Europe and Asia have been making these steps forward for some time but America is catching up now in cities like New York, Boston, San Francisco, and even Wichita.

From a municipal perspective, smart technology is being used to streamline city-provided services, and to oversee and regulate services provided by outside organizations in order to minimize frustration and dissatisfaction and to maximize economic growth and development. In Amsterdam, for example, the city has installed “smart” garbage bins, so that trash is collected only when the bin is full, thus making garbage collection more efficient and less costly.

There’s even more to know about smart cities, and we’ll cover that in “What is a ‘Smart City?’” Part 2.