Digital Transformation in the Hyperconnected World of 5G

Can you feel the anticipation? As we approach the era of 5G, excitement continues to build over the potential for new, disruptive digital services that are expected to flourish in tomorrow’s hyperconnected world. Digital technology is already transforming every facet of business and society, and the pace will only accelerate in the next phase of network evolution.

But despite the hype, this transformation doesn’t just happen overnight. If only we could flip a switch and (poof!) we suddenly have a complete ecosystem capable of supporting all the services that 5G and the Internet of Things (IoT) will deliver. To enable a responsive network that can live up to the hype, disparate new and legacy technologies will need to come together in a flexible and open infrastructure.

So how do we build a flexible platform that’s open, yet secure? At Fujitsu, we believe that digital co-creation is the answer. As the industry prepares for the next wave of network evolution, co-creation will enable information sharing and innovation beyond boundaries to deliver real digital transformation and business value.

Outside the Box

Arguably, the true promise of 5G will be the development of entirely new business models like we’ve never seen before. To deliver on that promise, network service providers will require a scalable ecosystem that spans technologies, industries and vendors. Secure, seamless, end-to-end connections across wireless and wireline technologies would be nearly impossible with yesterday’s proprietary architecture.

This vision of hyperconnectivity will be key to realizing innovative 5G business models, powering flexible bandwidth on demand to support the digital service ecosystem. Service-aware platforms that incorporate artificial intelligence, machine learning and big data analysis will enable a broad range of offerings, from high-speed home entertainment and IoT initiatives, to autonomous cars and smart cities. In order for tomorrow’s networks to provide a secure exchange of information across boundaries, however, service providers will require open, programmable interfaces for collaboration.

At Fujitsu, we’re uniquely positioned to help build this ecosystem, delivering a very scalable optical network, as well as intelligent software, to enable end-to-end 5G services across both the wireline transport network and the wireless radio access network (RAN). That’s why we are working closely with our customers as they plan and deploy the network infrastructure that will enable the hyperconnected 5G vision. This co-creation — with customers and industry partners— is about helping to advance the ecosystem and develop digital business models that will benefit network service providers, their subscribers and society overall.

For example, digital co-creation led us to develop our Virtual Access Network (vAN) solution, a flexible and cost-effective approach to delivering access services. With the vAN solution, service providers can support small and medium businesses with services that were previously cost-prohibitive, particularly in rural areas. Through the process of co-creation, we developed a new service that allows customers to save time, money and resources.

To Tomorrow and Beyond

The evolution of the hyperconnected world is quickly accelerating toward a future full of opportunity. Digital co-creation will be fundamental to making sure that service providers, and the entire ecosystem, are well-equipped to fully realize the 5G vision. And service-aware, conscious networks built on flexible, programmable, open platforms will be the engine that powers that digital transformation. To learn more about our vision for 5G, visit: https://fast.wistia.com/embed/iframe/r2fsy5ad9c.

The Promise of VoLTE: It’s Only a Matter of Time

VoLTE

Voice over LTE (VoLTE) is considered by many to be revolutionary both for mobile operators and for subscribers. Operators, once they have established their VoLTE networks, will no longer have to maintain separate networks for voice (circuit-switched) and data (packet-switched). This will save on operational and capital expenses. Subscribers who use VoLTE will be able to use high-quality voice and data applications simultaneously, and the clarity of their voice calls will improve.

So why has VoLTE taken longer than anticipated to deploy? The answer lies in several challenges, which I’d like to discuss briefly.

  • The successful roll-out of HD voice and video calling services requires VoLTE technology to be simultaneously available in both the mobile network core and on mobile handsets. Most mobile operators’ core infrastructures are not fully equipped to simultaneously support circuit-switched and packet voice. In addition, VoLTE-enabled handsets are not yet widely available.
  • VoLTE promises to move wireless calls from the legacy circuit-switched network to the all-IP-based LTE network. The formidable task of supporting both switched-circuit and packet-based technologies, however, is not economical for mobile operators in markets where LTE is not yet deployed. What’s more, mobile operators are still resolving VoLTE call interoperability issues to support customers who are roaming.
  • Finally, successful VoLTE deployment depends heavily on nationwide LTE deployment and the adoption of LTE-based small cells for in-building voice enhancements. Adoption of LTE-based small cells for residential and enterprise applications is still very low.

Despite these challenges, numerous efforts are underway to realize the promise of VoLTE.  To expedite nationwide rollout, several leading mobile operators have begun limited trials in major markets, testing voice quality and equipment interoperability. Suppliers are slowly rolling out VoLTE-enabled handsets; and a consortium of mobile operators is negotiating roaming agreements for smooth inter-network transitions. The potential long-term benefits of VoLTE to operators and consumers alike are too great to miss and they easily outweigh any temporary intermediate setbacks.